For all Herp Lovers^^

ABOUT
This blog is dedicated to all the people out there who love the scaly and slimy animals so many people seem to dislike! I will be posting photos, videos and care information for different kinds of reptiles and amphibians. Enjoy slithering around! Also, i would love to answer any questions you guys have about keeping herps as pets or health problems your pets may have. or just any questions at all lolll, id chat about reptiles all day^^ for those who like to keep them , the links below lead to great sites for finding care sheets on different kinds of herps!

LINKS

ASK ME ANYTHING

SEARCH

reptilesandexotics:

Albino Tiger Reticulated Python.

reptilesandexotics:

Albino Tiger Reticulated Python.

reptilesandexotics:

Musk Turtle, Painted Turtle, Map Turtle.

reptilesandexotics:

Musk Turtle, Painted Turtle, Map Turtle.

zolanimals:

Tree Frog

zolanimals:

Tree Frog

(Source: andigivemylife)

zolanimals:

Red-Eared Sliders Eating

zolanimals:

Red-Eared Sliders Eating

reptilesandexotics:

Twin Albino Tiger Reticulated Pythons, this is rare.

reptilesandexotics:

Twin Albino Tiger Reticulated Pythons, this is rare.

albino monitor!

albino monitor!

reptilesandexotics:

Once again, sorry for the lack of updates.  I’ve been in the woods fishing and catching big snapping turtles and frogs and things.  Don’t hold turtles by their tale unless they’re big enough(mad enough) to bite off your fingers.

reptilesandexotics:

Once again, sorry for the lack of updates.  I’ve been in the woods fishing and catching big snapping turtles and frogs and things.  Don’t hold turtles by their tale unless they’re big enough(mad enough) to bite off your fingers.

very cute box turtle enjoying a strawberry ^^

very cute box turtle enjoying a strawberry ^^

(Source: hydrotoxicity)

dailysnake:

Mountain Gartersnake. (by chadmlanel)

dailysnake:

Mountain Gartersnake. (by chadmlanel)

omfg i need a lizzard like Buddy

two headed snake feasting :P
check out this webpage for more two headed snakes! if ur into that kind of thing loll
http://www.gamellama.net/animals/strange/two-headed-snakes.html

two headed snake feasting :P

check out this webpage for more two headed snakes! if ur into that kind of thing loll

http://www.gamellama.net/animals/strange/two-headed-snakes.html

This is Janus the two headed tortoise. She belongs the Geneva Museum of Natural history. (she should really have two names since two heads is two different turtles! loll i say the other one be named Joplin :P)

This is Janus the two headed tortoise. She belongs the Geneva Museum of Natural history. (she should really have two names since two heads is two different turtles! loll i say the other one be named Joplin :P)

March 17, 2006—In biology, two heads are rarely better than one. But this unusual golden coin turtle, found in China, appears to be doing just fine. A businessman from the city of Qingdao says he bought the reptile at an animal market last year.
According to press reports released Wednesday, the turtle’s two heads cooperate well and can even eat at the same time. Its owner says the reptile eats more than one-headed turtles do and has grown over the past year. 
The creature most likely developed its unusual anatomy while still in the egg. Its embryo began to split in two—the process that gives rise to identical twins—but then failed to fully separate.
While uncommon, abnormalities caused by incompletely split embryos occur in many animal species, including fish, snakes,rats, cows—even humans, where the phenomenon leads to what are known as Siamese, or conjoined, twins.
Experts say survival rates for two-headed animals tend to be lower in the wild. But in captivity such animals can prosper. At the San Diego Zoo a two-headed corn snake named Thelma and Louise produced 15 normal offspring before it died.
—Sean Markey

March 17, 2006—In biology, two heads are rarely better than one. But this unusual golden coin turtle, found in China, appears to be doing just fine. A businessman from the city of Qingdao says he bought the reptile at an animal market last year.

According to press reports released Wednesday, the turtle’s two heads cooperate well and can even eat at the same time. Its owner says the reptile eats more than one-headed turtles do and has grown over the past year.

The creature most likely developed its unusual anatomy while still in the egg. Its embryo began to split in two—the process that gives rise to identical twins—but then failed to fully separate.

While uncommon, abnormalities caused by incompletely split embryos occur in many animal species, including fish, snakes,rats, cows—even humans, where the phenomenon leads to what are known as Siamese, or conjoined, twins.

Experts say survival rates for two-headed animals tend to be lower in the wild. But in captivity such animals can prosper. At the San Diego Zoo a two-headed corn snake named Thelma and Louise produced 15 normal offspring before it died.

—Sean Markey

very cute water dog ^^! (which is a type of salamander)

very cute water dog ^^! (which is a type of salamander)

Another cool amphibian. this is a three toed amphiuma!
Amphiuma tridactylum, the three-toed amphiuma, is the second largest of the three species reaching a maximum size of 106 cm (41.7 inches) in total length. The laterally compressed tail can compose up to 25% of the total body length. As with the other two species, the eyes are small, and there is a gill slit on each side of the head. This species has the most contrast between the dorsal and ventral coloration, resulting in a sharply bicolored salamander. The dorsal coloration consists of black, slate gray, or a brownish color, while the ventral surface is light gray with a dark patch on the throat.
Natural Range and Habitat
All three species are restricted in distribution to the southeastern United States. The one-toed amphiuma has the most restricted range, occurring only in the northwestern portion of the Florida panhandle and in the southeastern portion of the gulf coast of Alabama. The two-toed amphiuma occurs throughout mainland Florida, west to Louisiana, and eastward along the coastal states to as far north as Virginia. The three-toed amphiuma occurs in the gulf-coast states from western Alabama, westward through Mississippi and Louisiana to eastern Texas, and north (following the Mississippi River) through much of Missouri and into eastern Arkansas, western Tennessee, and extreme western Kentucky.
Amphiuma species are aquatic, although they periodically can be found on land at night during rainstorms or when the females are brooding eggs. The normal habitat for all three species is either permanent or semi-permanent bodies of water such as canals, ponds, ditches, sloughs, rivers, or streams. All three species live in burrows in the mud at the bottom of the waterway, such as those made by crayfish In addition, all three species are able to make their own burrows. If the body of water in which the amphiumas reside dries up, they will burrow into the mud where, depending on the species and size, they can usually survive until the next rain.

Another cool amphibian. this is a three toed amphiuma!

Amphiuma tridactylum, the three-toed amphiuma, is the second largest of the three species reaching a maximum size of 106 cm (41.7 inches) in total length. The laterally compressed tail can compose up to 25% of the total body length. As with the other two species, the eyes are small, and there is a gill slit on each side of the head. This species has the most contrast between the dorsal and ventral coloration, resulting in a sharply bicolored salamander. The dorsal coloration consists of black, slate gray, or a brownish color, while the ventral surface is light gray with a dark patch on the throat.

Natural Range and Habitat

All three species are restricted in distribution to the southeastern United States. The one-toed amphiuma has the most restricted range, occurring only in the northwestern portion of the Florida panhandle and in the southeastern portion of the gulf coast of Alabama. The two-toed amphiuma occurs throughout mainland Florida, west to Louisiana, and eastward along the coastal states to as far north as Virginia. The three-toed amphiuma occurs in the gulf-coast states from western Alabama, westward through Mississippi and Louisiana to eastern Texas, and north (following the Mississippi River) through much of Missouri and into eastern Arkansas, western Tennessee, and extreme western Kentucky.

Amphiuma species are aquatic, although they periodically can be found on land at night during rainstorms or when the females are brooding eggs. The normal habitat for all three species is either permanent or semi-permanent bodies of water such as canals, ponds, ditches, sloughs, rivers, or streams. All three species live in burrows in the mud at the bottom of the waterway, such as those made by crayfish In addition, all three species are able to make their own burrows. If the body of water in which the amphiumas reside dries up, they will burrow into the mud where, depending on the species and size, they can usually survive until the next rain.